Tata Motors: Making Eco-friendly Cars

Tata Nexon, a popular compact SUV car from the Tata Motors stable is going to be the first Indian car to be part of the End-of-Live Vehicles (ELV) process on an International platform.

Planet Outlook Initiative - October 28, 2020

Tata Nexon, a popular compact SUV car from the Tata Motors stable is going to be the first Indian car to be part of the End-of-Live Vehicles (ELV) process on an International platform. Tata Motors has declared that all the data related to handling the components that might be hazardous while dismantling of the car will be published to the International Dismantling Information System (IDIS) database.

Nexon

IDIS is an advanced and comprehensive information system for pre-treatment and dismantling information for End-of-Life Vehicles. More than 25 global manufacturers from over 40 countries use IDIS, which is a central repository of ‘Manufacturer Compiled Information’, across Europe and Asia. Tata Nexon is the first Indian car to join this elite group. IDIS contains data from 79 car brands with more than 3276 models and variants. IDIS provides a user-friendly navigation to an extensive database with practical information on pre-treatment, safety-related issues like airbag deployment and handling of HV batteries, on potentially recyclable parts and other safety-related elements mentioned in the EU ELV directive. The database of the IDIS consists of pieces of information that is accumulated from numerous car manufacturing companies, globally. Now the Tata Nexon becomes the first from India to be a part of this. They took this initiative to make cars more environmentally friendly by making the dismantling and recycling of its parts safer for the planet.

Mountain

Tata Motors will disclose its details about the extracting car liquids, handling safety belt tensioners, and the balance of airbags. It will make the task of Indian Authorised Vehicle Scrapping Facilities (AVSF) less environmentally taxing.  This ELV initiative of Tata Motors will also help in enhancing the governmental policy of Vehicle scrappage & Automotive Industry Standards (AIS 129). This will contribute to the protection, preservation and improvement of the quality of the environment and energy conservation

Old vehicles at the end create at least eight to nine million tons of waste just in the European countries. Globally, the situation is much worse. Tata Motors through this drive pledged to make all its cars more recyclable and eco-friendly through the ELV stages. President and CTO of Tata Motors, Rajendra Patekar, in this context added that the automobile products of the company consist of a bare minimum of the harmful substances and with the ELV process now it will further their ecological standards. According to Patekar, “At Tata Motors, our commitment to following sustainable practices is absolute. Accordingly, all our products are designed from the inception stage itself with high levels of recyclability potential to minimise material waste. Use of hazardous substances is restricted to a bare minimum while manufacturing and now with a defined process to manage ELV, we are laying down the path for responsible dismantling and recycling at the vehicle’s end of life stage. We are hopeful that such pioneering initiatives will encourage all auto industry stakeholders as well as customers to consciously consider sustainability and environment safety in their decision-making process while building and purchasing vehicles.” 

Sea Splash

Tata Motors has a rich legacy of adopting sustainable business practices. It established a proprietary International Material Data System (IMDS) where all suppliers mandatorily declare details of the material used for manufacturing vehicle components. It also releases design and system standards for recyclability and maintaining control over the usage of hazardous substances & material marking as part of Performance Attribute Targets (PAT) of Environment Management. Tata Motors remains committed to design vehicles that are environmentally green & sustainable, during its active life, as well as after its end-of-life. It also wants to set an example and encourage all auto industry stakeholders as well as customers to consciously consider sustainability and environment safety in their decision-making process while building and purchasing vehicles.”